Gear Lifestyle

But They’ve Taken All The Coal From The Ground

ax-men

Blue collar.

It ranks up there with the top sports cliches like calling someone a “workhorse” or “unselfish” or saying that someone has a “nose for the ball.” Some players are “lunch pail” blue collar types and others are “hard hat” and entire teams like to tout their blue collar attitude. But despite it’s common use in sports, is America slowly getting rid of the idea of that working with your hands can be a “good” real job?

Mike Rowe, often seen waist deep in some sort of foul smelling gunk on his show Dirty Jobs, sure thinks we have a problem and last Labor Day he sent out a video message calling for a new way of thinking.

We’ve declared war on work…we’ve made work the enemy.

Mike Rowe

Obviously I can’t pretend to be out bailing hay everyday since most of my normal 9-5 is spent sitting in a cube or planning to take over the world via advertising in very non-blue collar meetings filled with guys drinking fancy coffee drinks with 8 syllable names but I still recognize the value of getting your hands dirty every now and again.

Even more importantly I agree with Mike that it’s probably time to re-evaluate the idea of a “good” job since it seems like people are just struggling to get any employment in these tough conditions.

So how can we do our part at LaxAllStars? We all don’t need to be mechanics or construction workers to be real men but in the lacrosse world too many guys rely on other people to do the grunt work of stringing up a sweet spoon.

I’m here to call them out.

Time to quit being lazy, lax bros! Grab a spool of sidewall, a lighter, and your mesh/ traditional leathers of choice and get cracking!

Way to many bros claim they have “their guy” who’s works David Copperfield-style magic with a hockey lace. Here’s a tip: instead of handing over your faithful corner-ripping pal to a stranger, why don’t you take a seat, throw on the game tape of ‘Cuse vs. Cornell on mute, and hold a spoon weaving seminar so you can learn to do it on your own.

Teach a man to fish, Lax Nation.  Mike Rowe would approve.

_____________________________________________________________
So the graduations hang on the wall
But they never really helped us at all
No they never taught us what was real
Iron or coke,
Chromium steel.

About the author

Craven

Ryan Craven is a Co-Founder of Lax All Stars and has taken his passion for lacrosse from coast to coast and back again. Contact him at ryan@lacrosseallstars.com

5 Comments

  • somebody had to say and I'm glad it was us!
    If you can't string a decent mesh pocket you are just lazy because, quite simply, it just isn't that hard. and once you can string a decent pocket, you will learn how to string up a sweet bag in no time. then you move on to the traditional action, then you get the khakis, then you get the girl.

    this is particularly true for the guys who are ALWAYS fixing their stick (you know the guys I'm talking about). they do it before every game, in the middle of practice, etc. you know why? because they didn't string their own sticks and they don't know what the hell they are doing.

    Once you can string a stick to your own specs, you don't have to adjust it as much. that's just science. man up, embrace stringing and become a better player. sleeping with your stick doesn't hurt either, just make sure to buy it breakfast.

  • It is thanks to hard laboring jobs that I go to school. Commercial fishing up in Alaska each summer has not only paid for my college, but it has taught me a lot about working for everything you have and not being satisfied with anything less than your best effort. Mike Rowe has my vote.

    I remember when I first started playing, I thought learning to string your own stick was just another aspect of learning the game, so I have always done it myself.

  • It is thanks to hard laboring jobs that I go to school. Commercial fishing up in Alaska each summer has not only paid for my college, but it has taught me a lot about working for everything you have and not being satisfied with anything less than your best effort. Mike Rowe has my vote.

    I remember when I first started playing, I thought learning to string your own stick was just another aspect of learning the game, so I have always done it myself.

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