Hot Pot

Hot Pot Of Lax: Senior Leadership

Leadership

Lately I’ve been thinking a lot about Senior Leadership and what it means to a team. How important is it to have seniors leading a program? At what point does a coach ask his seniors to step up? And most importantly, what is the best way to inspire the seniors on a team to lead?

Personally, I’ve always felt that the authority and effectiveness of team leaders is completely dependent on their own self-confidence. Self-confidence and character. If a senior player is confident in himself and naturally respects his teammates, he’ll ultimately rise to the top as a team leader.

For today’s lesson, let’s play a little game I like to call “Fill In The Blank!” Drop a comment below with your answers and your own thoughts on Senior Leadership for your chance at winning free GTG helmet stickers for your team. The winner will be chosen at my discretion!

Problem 1: Aimless Senior vs. Excited Senior

Aimless Senior walks out onto the field with the rest of his team to play 6 v. 6 towards the end of the practice. He is in the middle of the pack, aimlessly wandering onto the field.

Excited Senior jogs out in front of everyone with his stick up and his head held high. Five underclassmen follow.

This is called ‘leading by example’ and ____________ might as well be named team captain.

Problem 2: Loud Senior vs. Screaming Senior

Loud Senior makes his presence known by directing traffic on the field while positively reinforcing his teammates actions and the instructions of his coach.

Screaming Senior takes personal frustration out on those around him and gets down on his teammates for the mistakes they make.

This is called being a ‘verbal leader’ and ____________ might as well be named team captain.

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About the author

Profile photo of Jeff Brunelle

Jeff Brunelle

Jeff Brunelle is the founder and CEO of Lacrosse All Stars. A west coast native and product of the MCLA, Jeff moved back East after college and truly fell in love with the game. He now spends every waking moment building LaxAllStars.com and Red Label Sports from our headquarters in Boise, Idaho. Follow Jeff on Twitter and Instagram.

13 Comments

  • 1) Excited Senior
    2) Loud Senior
    Brunelle,
    This really pertains to every level! Why wait for the seniors to step up, why not have the players that know how to lead step up immediately. However, there is a fine line, the leading player has to put the team first, otherwise he can easily let the power get to his head and become the other two types of seniors you described.

  • 1) Excited Senior
    2) Loud Senior
    senior leadership matters but it isnt everything.like said above if they wont step up then someoneelse will. butt in those gametime situations where experience and matal readiness comes into play, you need those seniors whove been there done hat before lead the team and set an example for the rest.

  • 1) Excited Senior
    2) Loud Senior
    In my opinion senior leadership and upperclassmen leadership in general is one of the most important pieces of a good team. Senior’s and especially captains need to be the ones who can get on the field and show they want to be there and that they want to win, if they do this well freshman and sophmores will want to get better so they can play with those leaders as equals. Also, if a senior class is small or really not being good leaders than juniors and really any upperclassmen need to step up. Just because you aren’t a captain or a senior doesn’t mean you can’t go out on the field and play hard and be loud on and off the field for your team. Without good leadership within your team whenever you lose or have a bad practice everyone will get into a bad state of mind and when you get on the field the next time your team won’t perform the way they should.

  • U Mass vs Albany. The vast majority of the shots for goal were overhand shots and not at the goalie’s feet. I think some MCLA teams could learn from that.

  • 1) Excited Senior
    2) Loud Senior

    I believe that because the whole team should be able to look up to someone that can guide them in the right direction, and teach them what they need to know. When a senior is doing badly and he takes it out on the rest of the team, the whole team starts not wanting to try. If the senior was supportive and apologized for his mistakes the whole team would move on and improve.

  • I agree, Wragg. There is a natural expectation for seniors to step up, but
    that doesn’t mean they are the only ones who can and/or should. Sometimes
    the best leaders on a team are younger guys who lead by example.

    Email your mailing address to me at jeff@lacrosseallstars.com using subject
    line “Senior Leadership GTG”

    Thanks!

  • 1) Excited Senior
    2) Loud Senior
    Being a senior it is important to step up within the first few days of practice. With a new season comes new teammates and it is important that they know they are welcome and that they are comfortable. During practice seniors should be hustling in and out of drills, while using positive feedback and even cracking some jokes to keep the mood light. The hardest job of a senior is helping the one or two kids on the team who are extremely shy. getting them involved and possibly creating the leaders for the next year.

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