Gear Mesh Stringing Tutorials

Anthony Kelly: This Is How You String!

Anthony Kelly, Ohio State legend / MLL All-Star / STX Rep/ all-around-wonderful-and-gigantic dude sent me some pictures of his latest string job.  He used an orange STX head and some turquoise mesh along with some white stringing to demonstrate how he likes to string up a mesh pocket.  Look hard and pay attention because not only is the A-Train one of the best face-off men in the MLL (he was an All-Star this past season), he can also rip the duck topping out in the triple-digit range (he broke 100 at the All-Star game) and he does it all using the same wand.  Diversity: LOVE IT!

The pictures were good enough that we’re not even including any words or instructions.  After all, the best way to learn how to string is to do it yourself over and over and over and over… looking at a masterpiece like the one below doesn’t hurt either though!

First things first: Top String. Unorthodox but I like it!

A little backside top sting... now you can figure out how he does it!

This is the sidewall. You want to get closer? Ok...

Get Closer. We did. Learn those knots boys, pretend you're a sailor!

Now you should be ready for the throat attachment. Spicy!

And here's the finished product! Sha-Zam!

LAS would like to thank Anthony for showing us how he strings his stick.  Any younger players (or even HS and College players) that want to be great should learn how to string their own sticks, and now it’s summer time (so you ain’t got $#%& to do) and we’ve provided these great references.  It’s time to get down to business!

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About the Author: Connor is a life-long lacrosse player who doesn’t know when to give up on the game. He played and coached at Wesleyan University and now plays for the Southampton LC in NYC. Connor lives with his fiance in Brooklyn and thanks her for allowing him to keep the dream alive.

Contact him at connor@lacrosseallstars.com.

About the author

Connor Wilson

Connor is the Publisher of LacrosseAllStars.com. He lives in Brooklyn with his better half, continues to play and coach both box and field lacrosse in NYC as much as possible, and covers the great game that is lacrosse full-time. He spends his spare time stringing sticks and watching Futurama.

3 Comments

  • Thanks for the props Connor! Just to give you all some idea of how I do all of my sticks, I thought I would write in with some more details to help out the young bucks.

    I always do my top string the same with the criss cross look – 1 it looks cool, but most of all its very functional. It keeps things nice and tight, pulls the mesh all the way up to the plastic, and it doesn't get loosened up much over time. I will go through when I have it in place and use needle nose pliers to pull it as tight as possible. If it's loose all the time, it will change where the ball releases which is a bad thing!

    Now for the side wall – I always double up the sidewall strings when I string, and I always start at the bottom and work my way up. With this one, I started on the 4th hole from the bottom and just sewed my way up to the top – its important to count out your holes first on the mesh to make sure the pocket will end up where you want it. After I finish that, I work my way back down, looping the sidewall string back under the initial string that I went up with. This does 2 things for me: 1 – the sidewall string runbs on itself and puts all the pressure back on itself, so when it rubs, it will rub against itself and not the mesh. This keeps me from ever blowing out any mesh during a game. 2 – It gives me more material to grab the ball during face-offs. Also, by using the sidewall material instead of more mesh (having a mesh mullet at the bbottom is no bueno!) it allows the pocket to grab when I clamp, but still release the ball when I pull it where I want it.

    People always ask why I start my sidewalls at the bottom. By doing this, it also allows me to have a really high bagged out pocket which helps a ton for shooting hard, and it also gives me a nice pocket to grab the ball for pinch and pops when I push it in for facing-off. Also, if you notice how I did the bottom sidewalls, this keeps the stick from becoming illegal when they go to roll the ball out – I eliminate all the material at the bottom.

    Lastly, always anchor your shooting strings to the plastic! Never tie them off to the mesh! When you tie them to the plastic they will not move once it's broken in. If you tie shooterst to the mesh or sidewalls the whole pocket will move as one and it will be inconsistent especially in bad weather or extremely humid days when it bags out.

    Thanks for the support guys! Hope this helps you guys all shoot and FO like me!

    Anthony Kelly #34

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