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Under Armour Lacrosse – 2018 Gear Reviews

Following up on our review of the new Powell Lacrosse heads and shafts, we’re bring you the low down on some of the newest gear from Under Armour Lacrosse.

Next up in our 2018 Gear Reviews Series we’re bring you the low down on some of the newest gear from Under Armour Lacrosse. Some of this stuff has just been released, while other items have been out for a little while, but these are some of the most exciting pieces of equipment to come out of the Under Armour lacrosse group in recent memory. We’re covering two different heads and a new pair of gloves below.

(Check out our other published 2018 Gear Reviews – Powell Lacrosse’s new heads and shaftsCascade Lacrosse’s new S HelmetMaverik Lacrosse’s 2018 gloves, shafts, and headsNike Lacrosse’s new head and gloves, and two new heads from Brine Lacrosse. There are even more 2018 gear reviews to come!)

Under Armour Lacrosse’s venture in the sport has been going strong for a number of years now, and this is a company that has definitely hit their branding groove when it comes to design and technology.

2018 Under Armour Lacrosse Heads

Command Low head – The Command Low has been out for a little while, but it’s still relatively new and a lot of players have yet to play with one, so I’m including it as a 2018 product. This head is a really solid design, and while it’s based off the original Command head, it’s definitely got a feel all to its own. It’s definitely lighter than the bulky OG Commnd, and it has a much thinner sidewall up high. This thinner high sidewall reduces whip in most pockets and creates a great stick for distributors and players who like a lower pocket.

A “high” or higher pocket is still achievable, and with the thinner sidewall, it just means these pockets have less whip. For a younger player who wants a high pocket, it makes the Command Low very attractive. It’s weird to think of a “low” head being perfect for a high pocket, but it still works well. The ball just comes out a little easier, and for some players, that’s what they need!

The Command Low is a solid head to string up, and it’s relatively easy to string a nice channeled pocket with good hold but no whip issues. The number and spacing on the holes overall is good, but it’s not an overwhelming amount of options, and the two holes on the top of the scoop are a bit too close together, which can cause a 9-diamond row of mesh to bunch a little. Overall it’s an easy head to string if you can get around those two small issues.

Overall the Command Low is light, strong, and strings up easily. It’s great for a baggy “all over” pocket, a typical low or mid pocket, or even a “no whip” high pocket.

Command II head – The OG Command has been updated and changed a little. It’s still stiff, and has a nice full sidewall running most of the way, but it’s lighter in a noticeable way, and the cutouts in the plastic take the original product to the next level. If you loved the general face shape, sidewall structure and feel of the original Command, all of that is back. But there are some key differences, and that’s where the II takes things beyond the standard the OG set.

When you pick the head up, the first thing you’ll notice is that the Command II is lighter than the original, and the difference is notable. The original was a solid head, and it was stiff and narrow, but a little clunky. The new version is still stiff and narrow, but it’s not nearly as heavy, and it’s just as solid. Some cutaways in the plastic, small changes to structure, and a seemingly different plastic accomplish this nicely.

There are other little details that have changed, including the shape of the sidewall holes, some of the placement of holes, and some other small cosmetic switches, but overall it’s the same head as the original, but it’s lighter and looks modernized. The original Command was a popular product, so I don’t see the Command II changing that fact one bit. This is still going to be a head for all positions on the field, but even more offensive guys might pick it up now that it’s even lighter for 2018.

2018 Under Armour Lacrosse Gloves

Command II gloves – Sometimes the second generation of a successful glove line is very similar to the first generation, and sometimes a lot of things get changed up. While the latter approach can be risky, if a company is able to take the best aspects and make some improvements to the line, the results can be really good, and that’s exactly what happened here with the Command gloves through Under Armour Lacrosse.

The OG Command gloves were basic lacrosse gloves, and they had a couple neat features. The most important thing about them was that they protected your hands really well and got the job done. The NEW Command II gloves are a big step forward, and there is a reason so many college teams will be wearing them this season.

When you pick the gloves up, they seem markedly cut back from the 2017 and before versions. The padding is still all there, but some of the padding parts have been cropped back and the gloves have a much sleeker look now. The fingers, knuckles, and flare pad in the back of the hand are very similar in protective value to the old gloves (which is great), but there is also an added level of flexibility to them. Right out of the bag these gloves are ready to go.

Moving up the glove, a huge change is seen at the cuff, and I’m a big fan of this new approach. Instead of a typical floating cuff, or a multi-cuff system, Under Armour Lacrosse has created a single large cuff which wraps the wrist, and flares away from the hand and wrist. The cuff is not as heavily padded as many of the other cuffs out there, but because of the flare, there is no seeming loss in protection. It results in amazing wrist mobility, and more than adequate protection and coverage.

Where this approach would seem to get risky is another big change area that UA pulled off really well. Instead of a typical cuff, where a round 1″ thick pad circles the wrist, UA has allowed their cuff to be floppy, and it sits on the wrist much more freely than most gloves can offer. This means that even if you fully cock your wrist, it is still covered, but the wrist itself is not encumbered. It’s really quite remarkable how simple it is, but huge props go to Under Armour for this risky new take on wrist and cuff protection. I’m genuinely impressed.

The palms are Ax-suede, with a little bit of added texture to them. They break in immediately, and with a little water (or spit), they are ready to go and provide a thin but tough connection to the old wand.

At first glance, these gloves seem a little too cut back, but I’ve worn them playing box and playing field and they pass the big test – When I’m playing I forget I’m wearing gloves at all. When I finish playing, I remember I was wearing gloves, because my hands don’t hurt and none of my fingers are broken. The Command II gloves provide protection, great flexibility and comfort, and a great connection to the stick. On top of all that, they’re very reasonably priced, when you consider how expensive lacrosse gloves can be.

2018 Gear Review Methodology – We did outreach to manufacturers asking them to send us any new (or relatively new) product they wanted reviewed for 2018. We made no promises on what we would say, and every brand is given an opportunity to participate. Our focus is on Heads, shafts, helmets, gloves, padding, and footwear. We will also a giant 2018 Mesh Review soon. No scores are given. We simply talk about the positives (and negatives) of any product. Our goal is to help you, the consumer, make informed decisions on equipment purchases. That’s it!

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