Gear Stringing Traditional

Traditional Thursday: Reader Questions Answered!

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This week’s Traditional Thursday selects a couple of readers’ questions, and then answers them! Want to know more about the floating sidewall? Or how to keep your stick from bagging out and whipping shots into the ground? CW has you covered!

Make sure you check out the Traditional Thursday archives. Want to share your work with the world? Hit us up on the Tipline! Got a question about traditional? HIT US UP, and maybe we’ll answer YOUR question next week!

Also check out Stringing With Old Grey Laxer, and The Legend Of Jimmy Butler for more stringing excellence!

About the author

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Connor Wilson

Connor is the Publisher of LacrosseAllStars.com. He lives in Brooklyn with his better half, continues to play and coach both box and field lacrosse in NYC as much as possible, and covers the great game that is lacrosse full-time. He spends his spare time stringing sticks and watching Futurama.

2 Comments

  • another tip for the floating sidewall ive read about before is to soak the sidewall in water before hand and string it while wet so when it dries it has more tension on it and doesnt bag out the pocket as much 

  • About the tension of the top-most shooting string in a traditional and finding that sweet spot where it’s not so tight that groundballs are problematic but it’s not so loose that you have “lip” (throwing off the scoop).

    After installing the shooter, hold the stick up like you’re performing a depth check of the pocket and then push up on the top-most shooter from backside of the pocket and then down from working-side of the pocket: the perfect tension is when the shooters can travel straight upward enough to be parallel with the scoop, while simultaneously traveling downward enough so that it falls out of the scoop’s way and won’t obstruct ground balls (or balls exiting the pocket).

    This is a tiny amount of travel, perhaps a quarter of an inch or one centimeter.

    This amount of vertical travel is simply a guide for stringing it right the first time. It is not to be confused with shift (not aligning the shooter behind interlocks, allowing it to move when the ball is thrown) nor is it to be confused with the tension on the interwoven shooting strings themselves (which should be as tight as you can get them).

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